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Friday, September 10, 2010

A Sample Of My Work

Today I am here to show you lucky viewers samples of my own work. These pieces are from my life drawing class.

The reason I show these is for some honest criticism on how I can improve my draftsmanship. I've been looking over at David Apatoff's Illustration blog. On his most recent post on George Bridgman's life-drawing class, he talks of today being a time of false praise. As an aspiring artist, I do not want that. I want plain honest criticism, pointing out my flaws as well as strengths, so that I know where I stand.

So to all of you true artists out there, I leave these before you to judge and give me criticism. It will hurt my ego, but it will be for the best.

To start off, here are some 2-5 minute gesture drawings





These are my class-long drawings




This is my two-day drawing. Our final in-class assignment.


I hope you found something you liked.

Until Next Time

7 comments:

Steven Hartley said...

Your artwork is great!! You ought to be proud of yourselves :)

I've entered Key Stage 4 and I'm starting GCSE Art and I have to start off with some Still Life stuff and I don't think I'll be doing scanning on it.

Yeah I won't be posting on schooldays Mondays to Fridays since my work I have to get through but weekends will do and I've just finished an article on Alice in Wonderland which took me about two hours to write.

Wonderful artwork you have - I congratulate you...

Roberto Severino said...

I like these a lot, even though I've never tried this type of gesture drawing for obvious reasons; however, I do draw from life all the time whenever I get my hands on a small sketchbook. What art school are you currently attending?

Sorry if I accidentally submitted this comment twice. Blogger said that I didn't type in the word verification thing right, but it also said my comment was saved.

Eric Noble said...

Steven - Thank you. I look forward to your Alice in Wonderland article. I'm sure it will be better than the tripe I've written about it.

Robert - I need to get into the habit of sketching all the time, as well as drawing more often. I'm not currently attending any art school right now. On the 20th, I start attending Lake Washington Technical College for their Game Design and Animation program. I figure that's as good as any training.

Oscar Grillo said...

These are very good academic drawings. Very well executed.
I understand that one has to go through this in order to train oneself but I have to say that I am not a great fan of live drawings. I think one should only draw what one hates or one loves. Very difficult thing to do in academic work. I am crazy about Egon Schielle drawings or Picasso's Les Demoiselles D'Avignon preparatory sketches. They go a long way in trying to interpret the human figure in expressive settings. Cezanne's human figures are quite ineptly drawn but in the scheme of his constructivist style they become harmonious on the page. Van Gogh had tremendous difficulty in drawing people but his portraits is invariably emotional and profoundly humane. I love distortion and raw energy in art. Two of my favourite portrait artists are Chaim Soutine and Wilhelm De Kooning, pure drawing energy and raw emotion. That's what I perceive as art. I don't know if what I say is clear but since you asked me for an opinion, I may be wrong, but this is the best I can say it. Warm embraces.

Will Finn said...

Hi Eric, kind of hard to follow up on someone as talented as Oscar Grillo, but his words are as inspiring as him art...

These are good figures studies. Drawing from good models is a great way to get a feel for the way things are as opposed to the way you think they are... I am still trying to master that... Cheers....

Eric Noble said...

Thank you all for your encouragement. You have helped to inspire me with new confidence. I will keep going.

Kirk said...

These are some nice studies. Despite Maestro Grillo's opinions, all the artists he mentions went through the at times dull process of life drawing, initially. I believe a handful of failed studies will contribute to some great imaginative or non-referential drawing. I believe it is a profound mistake when cartoonists fail to see the value of these tired, but no less important academic exercises, which everyone's favorites like Bob McKimson and Chuck Jones had under their respective belts.